Hope in a Passport

Hope in a Passport

Hope in a Passport

Written by Christopher V.

passportThis is my passport. Although worn, it is what proves that I am an American. Although torn, it shows that not only was I born in this country but this country is also my home. Many American children whose parents are undocumented are left with just a birth certificate. They are left with the uncertainty of “will my family be able to stay in this country, or will we be forced to leave.” If their family gets deported, they’d be seen as an alien in their parent’s country.

I started raising money on Friday, December 9, and given the generosity of friends, family, and people I don’t even know, I’ve been able to raise enough money for 15 Passports ($1250 to be exact). And that’s awesome! But there’s still a need, go to Christopher’s Facebook page and see how you can help.

 

Why is this more important today than ever before?

In 2015,Texas wanted to deny Birth Certificates to U.S.-born children of immigrants. Although Texas ended their attempt in July of this year, given the new administration coming in 2017, new policies remain uncertain.

 

Why is a US passport better than a birth certificate?

A passport is the most legal document to prove one’s citizenship. It also makes dual citizenship easier should an individuals family get deported. Without it, a child risks becoming an alien within their parent’s home country.

 

How will the money I give result in a passport for a child in need?

I am working with churches who hold Spanish masses. To me, this is the easiest way to get the message out that help is available. The first round of passports will be ordered this week.

 

How much does a passport cost?

For a child, it cost $80. All donations help though, and I’ll round up the final amount so know your money will result in a passport.

Luminating Letter to a Young Newlywed

Luminating Letter to a Young Newlywed

Luminating Letter to a Young Newlywed – Inspired by a difficult marital journey

Written by Ginny C.

Dear Newlywed,

As a teenage bride over 50 years ago, knowledge of the real world was lacking.  Financial difficulties, a miscarriage, isolation and depression were sitting on the doorstep. Due to a problem with the premises, we had to move from the apartment we had only been in for a few months.    Tension was mounting in the marriage.  This all happened within the 1st year.

Life’s challenges continued and seemed to become more complicated. The biggest problem facing the marriage was the lack of communication. Coping mechanisms that had been learned kept us entangled in a quagmire of gloom and doom due to multiple family issues.  Neither one of us knew how to begin to untangle the mess we were compounding due to lack of experience and resources.

I kept hearing the term coping mechanisms.  It seemed that no matter with whom I spoke, I was told that it was normal to have problems when you are young.  In the late 1960’s early ‘70’s there were not many places to turn.

Being a sporadic writer, I would keep a diary of sorts.  It would help a little since I really didn’t have anyone to talk with that I felt I could trust outside of someone that was clergy or medical.  The resources that I felt I had just made me feel that it was my problem, get over it.

needleworkI had an aunt that taught me to knit as a child. I learned to sew in Home Economics in high school.   Neither one was of much interest to me.  But, I needed something to occupy my time and utilize some form of talent I was hoping to find within myself.

Knitting seemed a better alternative to sewing.  Yarn was cheap and you could make something that could be given as a gift.  Knitting ended up not being so helpful, because, I would drop stitches and I would get pretty far along and there would be a hole in my work.

I switched to crocheting.  It was faster than knitting and if you made a mistake, you knew it pretty quickly after you made it and correct it without feeling like you had to start over.

The crocheting would go into full swing for Christmas presents and I would start right after Christmas for the next year.  Then I found
myself mixing in some knitting again.

After putting items in a small store on consignment people started placing orders.  The money that I received helped me buy materials for the gifts I was making.

When you are young there are a lot of baby showers and wedding gifts to be made.  I became pretty proficient at knitting baby sets (sweater, hat and booties) and crocheting afghans as wedding gifts.

The beautiful thing about needlework, I could keep my hands and my mind busy, which became very therapeutic and I was able to give a lasting gift made out of love.

I have come to the belief that giving of yourself and using the talents you have is both healthful and hopeful.

Portrayal of Hope Tapestry

Portrayal of Hope Tapestry

Portrayal of Hope Tapestry

Portrayal of Hope TapestryOn November 5, 2016, there will be a new activity introduced at LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited–Portrayal of Hope.

We are very excited about our reconnecting with Sunshine Joe Mallard. He has design a commemorative piece for  LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited 2016 LIGHTFEST Station in Louisville, where participants will be provided the opportunity to embroidery their names into the Portrayal of Hope Tapestry.


sunshine-joe-library-pictureSunshine Joe Mallard
is one of American’s premier Creative Embroidery craftsmen. He has been embroidering for more than 40 years.

Portrayal of Hope

As we take the message of HOPE Around the World—We Survive asks that everyone join this journey to create a Portrayal of Hope Project at his or her school, workplace or organization.

We may not always comprehend that poverty can be an entanglement of multiple circumstances. As we send messages of inspiration and hope around the world, We Survive and “Sunshine Joe” would like to see you incorporate HOPE into your daily lives and reach out to your community, city and the world at large bringing awareness to the issues of poverty, those susceptible to poverty, hunger and homelessness.

LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited
http://lightfestreignited.info/
https://www.facebook.com/lightfestcommunity?ref=h

Portrayal of Hope
http://wesurvive.org/portrayalofhope/
https://www.facebook.com/Portrayal-of-Hope-532362823620962/

Hope Through the Eyes of a Child

Hope Through the Eyes of a Child

Hope through the eyes of a child

Written by Sharon Cecil

hopechildrenOnce you have experienced hope through the eyes of a child who lives in poverty or a homeless shelter, you will never think of hope with the same perspective.

 

When attending a Day of Hope, parents prepare by hearing stories of past Day of Hope adventures or struggle with the thought of being taken to the country and being uneasy about the unknown that is facing them.

 

A child on the other hand, if left to their own volition, might conjure up the wonder and magical mystery of going to the country and what might be lurking in the woods.  Children can create images that are unique and out of nowhere their inborn natural relationship with nature evolves.

 

It is such a joyful time seeing the children arrive with a bit of apprehension as they transform into the world of nature with such ease.  While the older youth and adults are much more apprehensive, their transformation is not quite as quick.  But, everyone seems to find his or her place in nature before the day is done.

 

wideeyedinnocenceYou may have heard the term “wide-eyed innocence” when it comes to a child or childish behavior.  I personally find this behavior refreshing to see and experience.  For a day, those who attend a Day of Hope are able to put their cares behind them and just be free to be.

 

As a volunteer expresses in Day of Hope Inspires,  “Seeing the children and families being able to enjoy their day with playing games and being out in nature and being able to forget about life for a while was a great opportunity for me as well.”

 

When visiting We Survive’s Haven of Hope, a Day of Hope offers nurturance in nature providing supportive surroundings cultivating a safe environment for participants and the wildlife

 

At the end of the day, the participants talk about hope around a symbolic lighthouse and each participant is given a Key of Hope as a reminder that “THE KEY—Open Hearts 2 HOPE.”  Having been fortunate enough to see the children and families after Day of Hope events, many are still wearing their key around their neck with pride.

 

Remember

 

“You + Youth = Today’s Hope”

 

It is our HOPE that LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited will be world-changing!!

 

Firehouse Fest and Chef Jess

Firehouse Fest and Chef Jess

Firehouse Fest and Chef Jess 
LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited activities are geared towards innovative educational experiences while having fun.

The first Firehouse Fest was held on Saturday, May 9, 2015 was a great success! As noted by Sharon Cecil at her “Speaking Intergenerationally” blog site,  “Participants visited an historic firehouse and provided with valuable information for health, wellness and mental well-being.”

chefjessShortly after graduating from high school, Jessica began working with senior adults.  With a quiet demure, her rapport with the participants in the senior program was AMAZING.  She demonstrated a remarkable artistic talent.

With her incredible artistic ability it wasn’t surprising that she wanted to be an artist.  A Culinary Artist that is—something she had aspired to do since she was four years old.

At Firehouse Fest, participants enjoyed working with Chef Jess who volunteered her time decorating cupcakes, cookies and donuts on May 9 with graduation from the Culinary Arts Program on May 12, 2015.

LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited wants every young person to know, “If you can dream it, you can do It.” ~~ Walt Disney

Chef Jess epitomes “The Power of the Dream!”

To read more Portrayals of Hope go here.

Day of Hope Inspires

Day of Hope Inspires

Written by: Ryan Hatfield

mortar and pestalMarch 15, 2016

I first became involved with We Survive and Day of Hope as a first-year pharmacy student. The Day of Hope event was the first service learning project I had undertaken in pharmacy school. I didn’t really know what to expect other than I knew I was going to help provide health education to underprivileged children and their families.

Each of the pharmacy students were paired up with one of the children from the shelter. The child with whom I was paired was one of the older ones there, and he was definitely not thrilled that he had to participate. I tried talking to him and getting him to open up, but all I got was nowhere fast. I get it—we are from two vastly different worlds, and to be completely honest, I probably would have been just as aloof as he was if I was in his shoes.

The day itself had various activities. There was an educational component to it, of course, but the children and families also got to explore nature. For most of them, I’d hedge a bet that it was the first time they’d ever been out of the city. The young man with whom I was partnered started loosening up a little when we went on the hike, but he really came out of his shell when we went down to the creek. He absolutely loved being able to explore the creek. His biggest prize was the frog that he caught. We had to pry him from the creek when it was time for the groups to change activities. He did a 180 from the time he arrived at the farm to the time that he left. Being out at the farm did wonders for him, even if it may have only been for that day.

The children and families that participated in the event were so gracious and so thankful. If not for the Day of Hope, I don’t think a lot of these folks would have the opportunity to get out into the country and experience nature in its true form.

Seeing the children and families being able to enjoy their day with playing games and being out in nature and being able to forget about life for a while was a great opportunity for me as well. I’ve participated in the Day of Hope event each of my 3 years in pharmacy school. I graduate in June, and while I know that I won’t always be able to attend the Day of Hope event every year, it is an organization that I do wish to continue to support.

 

Ryan Hatfield, PharmD

Sullivan University College of Pharmacy, Class of 2016