What the Day of Hope Means to Me

What the Day of Hope Means to Me

What the Day of Hope Means to Me

by Jacqueline Blue Browning

blue and sharonThe love and compassion that Moody and Sharon share always struck me at my core. Here were two individuals who had discovered some of the secrets of life. Simple secrets, that get lost in the hustle and bustle of life as we know it to be on this planet today. Some of the most important secrets ; to stop and take the time to breath in nature, to be grateful for and appreciate the beauty of our Earth and to share with one another. These simple truths are often forgotten by many, yet when these secrets are put into practice the results are amazing.

I remember much laughter and wonderful conversations with the children and parents at Day Of Hope. This event is so important to the community. Providing children and families with not only hope but relaxation, a moment to pause and reflect and appreciate the beauty in the world. The atmosphere is always harmonious and everyone shares with one another and smiles.

6-15DayHopeCreek(3)I met Sharon Cecil when I was on my first clinical rotation for the LPN Program at Galen College. She was my first ever clinical instructor. She was so knowledgeable and compassionate. As I continued with my studies I moved on to the RN program. Upon graduation I began working with Sharon on the Day of Hope event. I partnered up with Whole Foods as they donate fruit, snacks and drinks for everyone. I enjoyed being the nurse educator and would provide health and nutrition information. My favorite part was always hiking with the kids. We would also go down to the creek and explore, face paint and paint rocks. We would have a fire pit and make smores. It was always a great time for everyone involved.

Hearing the laughter of the children, seeing the smiles on the faces of the adults, listening to the trees sway in the wind, smelling the fire pit’s smoke float and dance with the wind all while feeling the sun on our skin was one of my favorite memories. I have attended the day of hope for the last 5 years and will continue to for as long as I am able. I plan on continuing my commitment to Sharon and Moody and their vision. I will be graduating in 2019 as a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner and will continue to participate, create and be a part of Day of Hope.blue

 

Jacqueline Blue Browning, PMHNP- student

Eastern Kentucky University, Class of 2019

Is being called Pollyannaish insulting? 

Is being called Pollyannaish insulting? 

Written by Sharon Cecil

Is being called Pollyannaish insulting?

Glad

I have often been referred to as a Pollyanna. The definition of Pollyanna according to Merriam-Webster dot com, “a person characterized by irrepressible optimism and a tendency to find good in everything.”

I have considered being called Pollyanna a compliment. Think about how much gladness Pollyanna brought to the little town of Beldingsville, Vermont.

FYI— Did you know that there were sequels to Pollyanna known as “Glad Books,” published throughout the years? If not, check it out.

Being positive (Pollyannaish) can be catching…Even inspiring. A nurse by the name of Fran was my inspiration and virtual mother. She said that the best medicine was being positive and laughter. She was one of the greatest influences in my life. She was ABSOLUTELY right!!

During childhood, reading was an escape from the world around me. I loved reading happy stories like Pollyanna, mysteries and drama. The same thing goes today. As I’ve gotten older though, my reading time has taken a hit since watching happy movies, mysteries and dramas on TV.

The original LIGHTFEST held at Churchill Downs was, “billed as a `day of light and hope, “Bill Wolfe, The Courier-Journal March 24, 1997. It was an event that gave joy and gladness to all that attended.

Let’s cast a shadow on the cloud of doubt.

Let’s show the World that there is truth in being GLAD

Join the LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited Movement

Shine a Light of HOPE

On November 7, 2015 at 6pm Eastern Time, be apart of the LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited movement and display a Light of Hope. It can be a porch light, candle or flashlight…this can be done as a group or individually