Taxes on the Go Offers Hope for the Homebound

Taxes on the Go Offers Hope for the Homebound

Written by Sharon Cecil

In the fall of 2015, I found myself in a situation where I was pretty much limited due to a fall that created mobility issues. To the knee injury that imposed restrictions that I referred to as “stair incarceration” add blustery wind and a flurry of snow accumulation, home became my husband’s and my sanctuary.

During this time, there were a lot of people sharing stories about how it was hard to get out of their home to get things done. The information shared took me on an explorative journey to seek out services that are available to you when you are homebound.

Two services that I felt were vital included getting your taxes completed and food for the pantry.

Taxes on the Go Offers Hope for the Homebound

TaxFormIt is inevitable, that January brings with it that time of the year. TAX time! It can be one of the most grueling tasks that you procrastinate about for multiple reasons.

One young man’s story was fascinating.

Michael Fitzmayer has done tax preparation for more than 35 years. He will tell you that he has seen just about every type of tax situation in that time.

Mike started Taxes on the Go. He will come to your home with his laptop in hand and prepare your taxes.   He has the capability to e-file, but needs to file from his office to ensure that it is sent from a secure network.

In order to help people that were less fortunate than he is, Mike started doing Taxes on the Go. Mike wanted to be there for people who were in recovery situations and be able to reduce the cost for those with lower incomes or stressed financial concerns.

Mike talked with me regarding, “People with low incomes are going into tax preparation offices and being taken advantage of by paying very high preparation fees.”

When you can’t leave home, there is always the option to do your taxes yourself when you have access to the internet. For many people, they don’t have the luxury of owning a computer and internet access due to their financial limitations. Or health issues such as sight might make that option prohibitive.

Thank goodness that there are people like Mike who have put a personal touch to taxes.

Taxes on the Go takes the worry out of getting your taxes done if you can’t leave home.

Contact Mike at Taxes on the Go 502-640-8782. He will also prepare taxes at his office.

FYI—If you live in Louisville, you might want to check out ValuMarket’s Curbside Direct, Louisville’s original online grocery shopping platform that allows customers to buy all their favorite grocery items online in a safe and convenient way. Or check with your local area store to see if you can call in the day before to get your order delivered.

From Humble Beginnings a Childhood Vision Soars

From Humble Beginnings a Childhood Vision Soars

dovepeaceglobeFrom Humble Beginnings a Childhood Vision Soars

There are so many stories that could be shared about Moody Cecil’s love of nature and how he grew up walking the land that his grandparents owned, later owned by his parents and then passed down to him.

As a child, his Aunt Dumpy would take him hiking and his Uncle Lovell took him fishing on a regular basis.  On Sundays, the family would gather at the farm for Sunday dinner.  Moody’s mom (Alma) and dad (Moody Sr.) carried on the Sunday dinner tradition.

Cathy, Kent and their cousins Rita and Anita enjoyed their regular Sunday get together which included  hiking, playing in the creek, floating stick boats, making homemade ice cream with an old time hand crank ice cream maker and many other activities.  Anita says, “I have so many wonderful memories of Sunday dinners with Aunt Alma, Uncle Moody (Sr.), my dad, Junie (Moody Jr.), Cathy, and Kent. I will always cherish those memories as some of the best times in my life.”

Although Moody, Jr. (who we all knew as Moody) recognized that he was not cut out to be a farmer, he realized at a very young age he loved being on the farm.  Moody decided when he acquired the land; he had been given the privilege of being steward of the land.

10310015421

Moody and Cathy

Moody was dedicated to working with youth and the vision of creating “a legacy for future generations.”  He began exploring the possibility of a Certified Stewardship Forest (a designated given by the Kentucky Division of Forestry.

Moody’s children Michelle Wolf (Matt), Cathy Bellamy (Rob), and Kent Cecil (Stephanie); and grandchildren Kyle Wolf, Kate Bellamy, Jordon and Leah Cecil enjoyed being at the farm.

Moody loved to fish.  When each grandchild was born, he bought them fishing poles.  Rob reminded Moody’s wife Sharon that Moody had taken Kate fishing for the first time.

Rob also shared a Memory Moment about when Cathy, Kate and he were having lunch with Moody at Uno’s Pizza on Bardstown Road.  Kate was 3 or 4 at the time.   She looked at her Granddaddy and asked why he lived on the other side of Louisville.  Rob said that Moody calmly explained to Kate about our blended family, and said to Kate, “Cathy is my daughter and you are my granddaughter and I love you so much.”   Kate was completely satisfied with this information and never brought it up again.

One of Sharon’s fondest memories is of grandsons Jordon and Kyle going fishing with Moody and Kent.    They were thrilled that they caught a fish.  Excitedly, the boys came running back from the creek and told Sharon that they had caught a 5 pound bass.  When in actuality, it was a 5 inch bass.  Through the years, Sharon would tease Moody about how he had not only taught the boys to fish but also taught them how to tell fish stories.

Moody was a fierce champion for both the young and old. With his extraordinary love of nature, it was decided that Sharon and Moody Cecil would create an organization that would offer health and wellness programming that provided “nurturance in nature.”  In 1994, We Survive was born.

GazeboIn 2004, Anita said her wedding vows under the gazebo at We Survive—now referred to as Haven of Hope.  What a wonderful memory and tribute to her grandparents Florence and George Hahn.

As time passed, Moody’s memory began to fade. He lost many of the memories he held so near and dear.  Despite this, Moody never lost his desire to be around people of all ages or his love for nature. He even attended LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited on November 5, 2016.

Moody’s passion was working with children from all walks of life. He enjoyed being part of the planning and participating in Day of Hope http://wesurvive.org/day-of-hope/  activities at We Survive’s Haven of Hope.

 

Moody Cecil

March 23, 1932 – December 19, 2016

To read more about Moody’s story, read Amazing Vision Offers Guiding Light.

 

To Donate or Comment (and share a Moody memory) visit the

Moody Cecil Memorial Fund

A fund for the Haven of Hope Arts, Cultural and Nature Center.

beacon-of-hope

I know you would be standing beside me today,
if heaven was not so far away.

Like We Survive’s Beacon of Hope,
your presence has a far reaching scope.

Day of Hope Inspires

Day of Hope Inspires

Written by: Ryan Hatfield

mortar and pestalMarch 15, 2016

I first became involved with We Survive and Day of Hope as a first-year pharmacy student. The Day of Hope event was the first service learning project I had undertaken in pharmacy school. I didn’t really know what to expect other than I knew I was going to help provide health education to underprivileged children and their families.

Each of the pharmacy students were paired up with one of the children from the shelter. The child with whom I was paired was one of the older ones there, and he was definitely not thrilled that he had to participate. I tried talking to him and getting him to open up, but all I got was nowhere fast. I get it—we are from two vastly different worlds, and to be completely honest, I probably would have been just as aloof as he was if I was in his shoes.

The day itself had various activities. There was an educational component to it, of course, but the children and families also got to explore nature. For most of them, I’d hedge a bet that it was the first time they’d ever been out of the city. The young man with whom I was partnered started loosening up a little when we went on the hike, but he really came out of his shell when we went down to the creek. He absolutely loved being able to explore the creek. His biggest prize was the frog that he caught. We had to pry him from the creek when it was time for the groups to change activities. He did a 180 from the time he arrived at the farm to the time that he left. Being out at the farm did wonders for him, even if it may have only been for that day.

The children and families that participated in the event were so gracious and so thankful. If not for the Day of Hope, I don’t think a lot of these folks would have the opportunity to get out into the country and experience nature in its true form.

Seeing the children and families being able to enjoy their day with playing games and being out in nature and being able to forget about life for a while was a great opportunity for me as well. I’ve participated in the Day of Hope event each of my 3 years in pharmacy school. I graduate in June, and while I know that I won’t always be able to attend the Day of Hope event every year, it is an organization that I do wish to continue to support.

 

Ryan Hatfield, PharmD

Sullivan University College of Pharmacy, Class of 2016

Attitudes Are the Real Disability

Attitudes Are the Real Disability

henry-holden-1

Henry Holden

In 2014, Madison Pierce from Los Angeles, California was given an assignment to write about someone who not only inspired her but also overcame adversity.  Madison shared with us her story regarding Henry Holden a LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited Ambassador.  As we Celebrate Hope in 2016, STAR Ambassador Henry Holden will shine brightly for LIGHTFEST Re-Ignited.

“Attitudes Are the Real Disability”

Written by Madison Pierce, Los Angeles, CA

image1Henry Holden’s life journey has inspired many people all over the world to not give up and have determination. He was born in Germany in a displacement camp called Fahrenwald, near Munich, on March 20, 1948 and is known for never letting his disability get in the way of anything he sets his mind on. Faced with a disability that left him unable to use his legs, Henry Holden speaks primarily at colleges, influencing and inspiring students and all who listen.

Henry Holden was 4 years old when he remembers walking with his mother, and couldn’t walk correctly. Later that night he woke up and started screaming. His parents called the ambulance which took him to the hospital. The emergency room doctors informed Henry’s parents that he was faking and could walk just fine. After more tests, the doctors realized that Henry had polio in both of his legs and would be permanently disabled, never able to walk again without the help of crutches and/or braces. He has had about six arduous surgeries on his legs. Even with his polio, Henry was gallant and still played baseball, football, and other sports with his neighborhood friends. Henry’s determination to assimilate was as powerful as Edison’s perseverance in developing the light bulb. His parents had high expectations for him, and for Henry, that was very important. It was both his parents and his neighborhood friends that inspired him to never give up on himself. According to Henry Holden’s website, “Don’t DIS the ability” is his “compelling message.”

Henry Holden currently is a motivational speaker, actor, comedian, writer, and two-time LA Marathon participant in a wheel chair. He speaks mainly at colleges, and has traveled all around the United States of America, and internationally to England and Bermuda. He has given over one hundred speeches. He recalls one time he was speaking at a school in Minnesota and the people who brought him in said that a student was going to drop out. The student decided not to after hearing Henry speak. Sharon Cecil from the Courier Journal states, “Thank you for showing not only me but also the world what can be done when will overcomes adversity!”

Henry Holden has been seen on many television shows. Some of these shows include: Becker, TJ Hooker, After M.A.S.H, Knotts Landing, and Hunter. He loved performing in these shows because they didn’t focus on his disability. He played characters that happen to have a disability. He is most proud of the show Kids Incorporated, a Disney show that Fergy was on. The show’s message that people can do anything they want, regardless of having a disability, made a big impact on people’s lives, especially the children who watched the show. Henry Holden has also written The Hitman and Other Short Plays, which features Henry as one of the characters. The Hitman was made into a 10 minute short film. Stated on Henry Holden’s website from one of the audience members at a recent conference, “What you’re doing is opening the eyes for people who didn’t know they could see”. “Mr. Holden is an excellent speaker. He is not only positive and humorous, but stands as an excellent role model. Mr. Holden, I greatly admire you!”

img_8007Henry Holden has made a difference in many people’s lives, telling them to never give up; never let anyone tell you, you “can’t” do something, show them that you can. He never felt indignant about his disability, it only made him more singular. As his famous and well-known slogan goes, “Attitudes are the Real Disability!”  Henry resolutely states “There is nothing negative about an individual. Everything about a person is positive. You just have to focus on the positive.”